Sunday, July 30, 2017

4 Essentials to Start Your School Year

Writing alongside those in the #compelledtribe, we commit ourselves to reflection through writing. Personally and professionally each member of the tribe has had their own takeaways on how it has, and will, impact their teaching, leading and learning.

Blogging is not about self-promotion. It is not intended or suggested to be a platform for ones agenda. Rather, blogging is about growth. As we consider the profession we are in, it should be apparent that we blog to become more skilled in what we do. The writing we share and the time and mental consumption of our words are merely intended to be a part of the bigger journey.

As I think about the time away this summer and the experiences I have enjoyed, I immediately find myself connecting these back to my school, my students and the community I serve. Simply stated, life is a series of moments and experiences that will shape and define ones own story. If that is the case, then the opportunities these past few months have me prepared for the weeks and months ahead and are setting us up for some great successes.

Here are some things to consider as you head back-to-school and how your experiences this summer may become a spring-board of excitement and direction for the path you are about to embark down.

1. It starts and ends with relationships. A summer of various events could not, and would not, have been as enjoyable as they were if it were not for the genuine care and support of the people that were on the journey together. Whether immediate family or close friends, the better we knew each other, the more value there was in the experience. As you head back to school, put this first and keep it there. Know your community of learners and leaders. As the year progresses, do not lose sight of the importance of those relationships from the first day all the way until the last.

2. Get out of your comfort zone. Personally I like my comfort zone. Two feet on the ground, routine and planned events are my norm. This summer I put that mindset on the back burner. One could say that I adopted a growth mindset for adventure. Whether a ride to the Grand Canyon high above the ground, sailing across Cayuga Lake or spontaneous outings with the family, it was invigorating and rewarding to push myself out of my comfort zone. Thinking of your staff and students, consider the same. Mix it up, try something new and expand your boundaries of teaching and leading.

3. Model the way. As my kids grow older I find them leading the way in some of our adventures. Where I would normally stick to that above mentioned schedule, I found myself pushing away from that and as this summer demonstrated, I modeled the way. As the summer moved on, I embraced the notion of having to model what is not only expected but also what is encouraged. Whether in the classroom or the conference room, do the same. Model what you want and what you desire to be attained and you'll be instantaneously amazed on the results you get in return.

4. Trust (and hold others and yourself accountable). Early in the summer the leadership of the district had an opportunity to continue our journey in building our culture by working alongside Tim Kight of Focus 3. Within his message something hit home in a way that I needed to here. He spoke in great length (but in simple terms) about the significance of trust in our profession. Heading back to the office this past week I am excited to have a greater understanding of how trust will be a focus of my leadership. Of course, as we lead others and observe those that we serve (and identifying when trust is broken) tough and direct conversations will follow. In your classroom this coming year consider how trust will play a role in your work with your stakeholders. If a building or district leader, do the same. Set levels of trust with those around you. Encourage them along the way.

The list could, and should, continue as you apply your summer lessons to the work you are about to embark on. Remember that growing is part of what we do as teachers and leaders. Whether you do so through reading maybe even blogging, make a pledge to yourself that you will continue to push yourself and apply your life lessons, your series of experiences, to your daily work.